Duct Tape and Cover

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Di Yong-Jin (Gene) Park

U.S.A., 2005 , 4min., color, Sony HD Cam

- Yong-jin(Gene) created this work in response to the Department of Homeland Security's recent advice for Americans to ready themselves for possible chemical and biological warfare. This animation shows how to use duct tape, and what to do when the event actually happens (sarcastically).

FILM SYNOPSIS:

- Yong-jin(Gene) created this work in response to the Department of Homeland Security's recent advice for Americans to ready themselves for possible chemical and biological warfare . He have designed an animation, which is his take on the uses of duct tape as a defensive measure in the event of a terrorist attack, showing what to do in the event of an actual occurrence.
In 2003, this government warning set off a race to hardware stores and home improvement centers to stock up on duct tape, this warning is still being conveyed to the public. Does using duct tape and plastic make us safer now?
Those are largely ineffectual and make me think how we are vulnerable and need real solutions rather than an airtight room.(something about our vulnerability) In this view, he thought “Duck and Cover” drills which instructed children from time to time against potential nuclear attack from Soviet Union during cold war period, could match well to deliver current United States’ concerns especially about biological attacks by terrorists. The absurdity of being able to survive a nuclear attack, by putting your hands over your neck, is mirrored in the notion of keeping out biological agents by covering your mouth.
He tried to design this serious issue in a dry manner by using similar information graphics manipulated to fit his story of “Duct Tape and Cover”. He is asking his audience to think of what we really need to do to survive something like a biological attacks, and its impossibility. What can we do to survive in the event?

DIRECTOR’S BIO:

-Yong-jin(Gene) sees graphic design as an outlet to educate and persuade people through the creation of visual narratives. He enjoys experimenting with new methods of creating motion. The diversity in his work is the result of his roots in Seoul, Korea, his exposure to American culture through graduate study at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and the past three years of his life in the U.S. While at the Art Institute, he completed many motion graphics projects focused on social issues. He currently lives in Chicago, and pursues a career in broadcast design, animation and live action film as a motion graphics designer at Digital Kitchen. He experiments with new approaches to teaching motion graphics as an instructor at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago.